Celebrating the 5-Year Anniversary of the GCI

Celebrating the 5-Year Anniversary of the GCI

By Alex Waked, Co-Chair for the GCI

The Green Chemistry Initiative (GCI) at the University of Toronto was founded back in 2012 – it’s crazy to think that we’ve already reached the 5-year milestone. Before you know it, it’ll be 10 years, then perhaps even 20 years! But before we talk about the future, it’s always a good idea to take a step back and reflect on how we’ve gotten here in the first place. This organization wouldn’t even exist had it not been for the vision of co-founders Laura Hoch and Melanie Mastronardi, with help from many graduate students keen on educating themselves and their peers about sustainable practices. With the help of all the other dedicated GCI members over the years, they helped the GCI grow to the point at which we’re now standing. Being the 5-year anniversary of the GCI, I reached out to all the previous co-chairs and asked them to reflect on their time spent here.

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GCI group photo from 2013

Laura Hoch (Co-Chair from 2012-2015):

I’m so excited to help celebrate the GCI’s 5-year anniversary by sharing some reflections and favorite memories from my time with the group. When I look at all the GCI has done over the past 5 years, I am so happy to see how much impact we’ve had. Within our own department, all the events and initiatives – trivia, seminars, workshops, the waste awareness campaign, and many more – have really raised awareness about green chemistry and made it more tangible. Through our work, we have also helped to inspire other students in Canada and around the world to get active, start their own student groups, and promote green chemistry in their own communities.

It’s really hard for me to pick a favorite event or project that I am most proud of – in my extremely biased opinion, we’ve done way too many awesome things! – but for me one of the moments when it really hit home how much of an impact we were having was at a networking session at the ACS Green Chemistry & Engineering Conference in Washington D.C. Waiting in the food line, I randomly ended up talking to a researcher at DuPont. When I mentioned that I was from U of T, he said “Oh! Are you one of those intrepid students from Toronto?!” and proceeded to describe in detail many of our activities and initiatives. It blew my mind that here was a complete stranger from Delaware, who wasn’t even an academic, who had heard of us and thought what we were doing was great.

I can honestly say that helping to start the GCI was by far the BEST thing I did in grad school. I’ve learned so much and have met so many amazing people through our work. I am so proud of what the GCI has accomplished and I really look forward to seeing what the GCI will do in the years to come!

Melanie Mastronardi (Co-Chair from 2012-2014):

It seems like just yesterday that we started the GCI, I can’t believe it’s been 5 years already! Thinking back to where we started (just a handful of grad students who wanted to learn how to conduct our research more sustainably), I’m so proud of all the GCI has been able to accomplish. From weekly trivia challenges to department seminars to hosting students and speakers from all over at our annual symposium, the GCI has created so many opportunities for students and researchers to learn about green chemistry and how to implement it. It’s also absolutely amazing to hear stories of how we inspired students at other universities to start similar organizations! One of my personal favourite projects was launching the 12 Principles of Green Chemistry video campaign. We’ve come a long way from the first one we filmed in Jes’ kitchen and last time I checked we are only 3 away from completing the full set!

Laura Reyes (Co-Chair from 2014-2016):

I am so grateful and proud to have been a founding member and co-chair for the GCI, and continue to be impressed by everything that the group does. It feels surreal to look back on everything that we have accomplished in only 5 years. The GCI started from the curiosity of a few grad students wanting to know how green chemistry could be applied to our own research, and now the group is well-known and respected throughout the green chemistry community as an example of a student-driven education effort. In that time, the GCI has managed to change the conversation around green chemistry in the UofT chemistry department. Subtle changes have compounded into a larger cultural shift, including anything from curriculum development for undergrad courses and labs (and signing Beyond Benign’s Green Chemistry Commitment!), to faculty members self-identifying as using green chemistry in their work. There is still much progress to be made, of course, but looking back on the accomplishments of the GCI and the professional experience that we all gained in being a part of this, it is hard to not feel proud of every project and event that we organized, starting with our very first seminar on the basics of green chemistry to recently teaching that seminar ourselves at the 100th CSC conference!

GCI group photo 2017

GCI group photo from 2017

Erika Daley (Co-Chair from 2015-2016):

Congratulations to all previous and current members of the Green Chemistry Initiative on its 5th anniversary! I was incredibly proud of all the accomplishments and activities that took place during my time as co-chair, and continue to be delighted by the success of the group. I think the value is especially put into perspective in my career when researchers, faculty, students, and industry employees know of or recognize the GCI and the impact it has had all over North America. While it is impossible for me to pick one particular initiative to highlight here, I think the collective outreach, education, data collection, and subsequent actions of the entire GCI team – from the departmental waste awareness campaign, to the community outreach events, to the undergraduate curriculum development – are all so important and speak volumes to what a group of dedicated student volunteers can accomplish.

Ian Mallov (Co-Chair from 2016-2017):

The 5-year anniversary of the GCI is an opportunity to reflect on our mission and goals. What did we want to accomplish, and what have we accomplished? Personally, I’m most proud of the fact that we have successfully ingrained green chemistry education into the fabric of our department through establishing regular events like symposia, seminars, and trivia, and that we helped encourage the department to sign the Green Chemistry Commitment. Green chemistry education should be fundamental to chemical education – it is our job as chemists to understand matter at the molecular and nano levels. I view the primary mission of green chemistry as a mission to impart a sense of responsibility to chemists to manage matter safely. I would hope the GCI has brought more chemists at U of T and beyond to consider this responsibility, and I’m really encouraged by the bright, dedicated people who continue to lead the GCI forward.

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ACS Summer School on Green Chemistry and Sustainable Energy 2017

ACS Summer School on Green Chemistry and Sustainable Energy 2017

By Samantha Smith, Yuchan Dong, and Shira Joudan

Yuchan Dong, who previously studied in China, had begun to miss life with roommates while in Canada. She reminisced about how you could talk about your lives late into the night, and spend meals chatting with friends in the cafeteria. “Luckily, at the ACS summer school, [she] got the chance to experience such life again and got to know a lot people who share same interests.” The summer school brought us back to the more carefree times of our undergraduate lives. Living in dormitories, sharing a floor with fifty-two other highly educated students, sharing every meal with our newly-formed friends, and even tackling homework assignments were just like the “good old days”. The level of diversity strengthened the value of peer-networking and real friendships were made throughout the week.

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The week wasn’t just filled with relaxing chats in the Colorado sun; that was merely how we spent our free time. The days were jam-packed with riveting lectures during the day, assignments in the evening, and getting to know the local Golden beers at night (which was obviously a duty of ours as tourists). We also had the chance to take in the local scenery with hikes and whitewater rafting.

The ACS summer school on green chemistry is a competitive program offered to graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and industry members every year in Golden, Colorado. Hosted by the Colorado School of Mines, the program consists of five days of lectures from green chemistry and sustainable energy experts, two poster sessions, a whitewater rafting trip, and lots of opportunity for networking. This program teaches global sustainability challenges with a focus on sustainable energy. The ACS Summer School is free of charge for successful attendees, including travel, accommodation on campus, and meals.

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Samantha, Yuchan, and Shira at the ACS Summer School

Jim Hutchison, a professor at the University of Oregon, spoke about how his department has completely reformatted their undergraduate chemistry curriculum to contain green and sustainable chemistry, something that particularly sparked Shira’s interest as lead of GCI’s Education Subcommittee. Bill Tolman, Chair of the University of Minnesota Chemistry Department, shared how students successfully cultivated the safety culture within his department. This had inspired Samantha to create new initiatives within our chemistry department. Queens University’s Professor Philip Jessop taught us about Life-Cycle Analysis (LCA) and assigned us multiple processes for which we calculated the gate-to-gate LCA. Mary Kirchhoff and David Constable from ACS gave talks on green chemistry and ACS resources, many of which would be useful to other departments. The format of the summer school allowed plenty of time to chat with the guest lecturers during coffee breaks, lunches, and poster sessions.

Many real-world issues were discussed. The worldwide energy usage and sources of energy were a main topic of discussion, as was the use of alternative sources. We were blown away by how multi-disciplinary green chemistry is, and we were enlightened on how we need experts in all fields to successfully create sustainable chemistry. We learned that to be able to effectively tackle environmental issues we need great synthetic chemists, whether they specialize in organic, materials or catalysis, as well as analytical chemists, engineers, environmental chemists, and toxicologists. We also need effective entrepreneurs and lobbyists.

Nearing the end of the summer school, a large group of us hiked up Tabletop mountain to get the most amazing view of the valley. A warm feeling of appreciation towards the summer school for bringing us out of the isolation of individual research in the busy city life was shared. We would like to thank ACS for giving us the chance to attend this amazing week. This experience has truly been beneficial to us, and we plan to use the knowledge gained during the week in our own studies as well as pass this knowledge on to our coworkers at the University of Toronto.

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Tabletop mountain in Golden, CO

We highly encourage anyone interested in green chemistry and sustainability to attend this beneficial program. Application deadlines are early in the year and submitted online. The application consists of the applicant’s CV, unofficial transcript, letter of nomination from faculty advisor or another faculty member, and a one-page essay describing your interest in green chemistry and sustainability as well as how it will benefit the applicant.

UofT Demonstrates its Commitment to Sustainable Chemistry

“We’re very pleased and proud to announce that the Chemistry Department has recently joined the Green Chemistry Commitment (GCC)!” – Dr. Andy Dicks, University of Toronto, Associate Professor

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GCI Members Fall 2016

The University of Toronto has recently signed the GCC making us the first school outside of the United States to sign onto this impactful commitment, which now contains 33 colleges and universities. The GCC is overseen by Beyond Benign, a United States not-for-profit organization created by Dr. Amy Cannon and Dr. John Warner, a founder of the principles of green chemistry. Within the GCC, academic institutions collaborate to share resources and know-how in order to positively impact how the next generation of scientists are educated about sustainability issues. Participating departments commit to green chemistry instruction as a core teaching mandate. The aim is to provide undergraduates and graduates with the required understanding to make green chemistry become standard practice in laboratories around the world. This, in turn, ensures that when graduates of the university enter the workforce, they are armed with the knowledge of how to make molecules and processes more sustainable and less toxic by adhering to the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry.

The GCC unites the green chemistry community around shared goals and a common vision to grow departmental resources to allow a facile integration of green chemistry into the undergraduate laboratories as well as to improve connections with industry which creates job opportunities for sustainability-minded graduates. Their website offers many resources for those interested in reading actual case studies and laboratory exercises, so please click here to visit their website and be informed!

Our chemistry department has already improved the green chemistry content in our undergraduate laboratories by updating the first year courses and upper year synthetic chemistry courses to include various graded questions about the Twelve Principles as well as ensuring the undergraduates are thinking about how they could make their current lab protocols more sustainable. Additionally, students can choose to study the fate of chemicals in our environmental chemistry courses offered. Of course there’s always room to improve, so the Green Chemistry Initiative (GCI), in collaboration with Dr. Andy Dicks, is working on evaluating the undergraduate chemistry curriculum’s current focus on sustainable chemistry and toxicology, in hopes to further improve our undergraduate’s learning experience. The GCI also provides many educational opportunities to department members such as our Seminar Series as well as many outreach opportunities, making our group a driving force in the integration of green chemistry principles to the department. Lastly, the University of Toronto chemistry courses reach thousands of students a year, and by being the first Canadian university to sign this commitment, we are working towards a greener future in Canada!

Thank you for celebrating this very momentous achievement with us!
Karl Demmans, Ian Mallov, Shira Joudan, and Laura Reyes

Green Chemistry Education through TAs at the University of Toronto

By Julia Bayne, Member-at-Large for the GCI

Green chemistry education is one of our main initiatives within our chemistry department. As part of an ongoing collaboration, we, the Green Chemistry Initiative (GCI), work with the teaching faculty to help modify and improve the undergraduate curriculum through the incorporation of green chemistry. This partnership has resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of green chemistry taught in the classroom and the modification or replacement of a number of experiments in the laboratory component of these courses. For example, the University of Toronto offers a third year undergraduate chemistry course (CHM343H: Organic Synthesis Techniques) that has undergone a complete transformation and now largely emphasizes the main concepts of green chemistry. Not only is the theory discussed in lecture, but the students are also strongly encouraged (and graded on their ability) to integrate green chemistry practices into their experiments in the laboratory.[1]

Green Chemistry for TAs Handout - page 1

We created this handout to encourage TAs to teach their students the basics of green chemistry [PDF].

Although this initiative has emphasized educating the undergraduate students, we found that the teaching assistants (TAs) and laboratory demonstrators did not always have a strong training in green chemistry themselves, and therefore did not necessarily feel comfortable teaching green chemistry concepts to their students. With this in mind, our next goal was to create a handout for TAs that would contain a concise explanation of green chemistry, along with some tips that they could use to help encourage students to align their thinking with the 12 principles of green chemistry. This handout, entitled “Tips for Teaching Green Chemistry to Students (pdf)” contains a brief explanation of green chemistry and lists the 12 principles of green chemistry with a short summary to highlight each one. The handout also includes suggestions on how to encourage undergraduate students to properly implement these principles into their laboratory practice.

Subsequently, we chose to highlight four key teaching points (pdf) through fun graphics that help emphasize the importance of green chemistry in the lab. The key points are as follows: 1) Work on a small scale, 2) A higher LD50 (median lethal dose) value typically indicates a safer chemical, 3) Minimize solvent use when washing glassware, and 4) Separate waste in the correct container so it can be disposed of accordingly. By simplifying and highlighting these important points, we hope that TAs will feel more comfortable teaching a few basic green chemistry concepts to their students, and similarly, we hope that the students will gain a better understanding of how to apply the principles of green chemistry to real-world situations in the laboratory.

Green Chemistry for TAs Handout - page 2

Starting from the perspective of undergrad labs, we picked these 4 key green chemistry teaching points to emphasize to the TAs [PDF].

We anticipate that by reaching out to the graduate students who teach the lab component of the undergraduate courses, they will themselves be more comfortable and excited to teach students about green chemistry, including the straightforward substitutions and modifications it has to offer. Ultimately, we hope to see more enthusiasm among the undergraduate students as they grasp the importance and benefits of including green chemistry in the laboratory component of their courses and potentially research laboratories in the future.

References:

[1] Edgar, L. J. G.; Koroluk, K. J.; Golmakani, M. and Dicks, A. P. J. Chem. Ed. 2014, 91, 1040-1043.